Inspiring Jewish life in Texas and Oklahoma all year long

Follow Me to GFC: Chords and Lyrics

 

Follow me to GFC

Music: Arlo Guthrie

Lyric: Loui Dobin

C                                 A

Bring your Lexus to Bruceville Texas

 

D                   G     C

Follow me to G-F-C

 

C                                 A

Bring your Lexus to Bruceville Texas

 

D                   G     C

Follow me to G-F-C

 

C

It’s about an hour north of Austin

 

C7

A century south of Boston

 

F

A little west of Waco

 

G#

You can’t get lost so

 

C                                 A

Bring your Lexus to Bruceville Texas

 

D                   G     C

Follow me to G-F-C


Bring your Lexus to Bruceville Texas…Come to Greene Family Camp

It’s an Hour north of Austin, A century south of Boston

A little south of Waco…You can’t get lost so

Bring your Lexus to Bruceville Texas…Come to Greene Family Camp.

 

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the Earth. And it was twelve midnight.

 

Eons ago, the land upon which you are now sitting was covered by a vast inland sea. The sea stretched from what is now Mexico to what would one day be St. Louis, but he wasn’t a saint yet.

 

For years the seas were uninhabited by anything alive. The area around this primordial sea was constantly boiling with volcanic activity. It wasn’t a very nice neighborhood.

 

500,000 years ago, the first Texans appeared, they were single-celled critters who processed sunlight into energy. They were then eaten by progressively larger Texans. A practice that exists to this day.

 

It wasn’t long, in fact, until some of these folks grew legs and began to experiment with living out of the water. Obeying the commandment “Lech Lecha”, get you out, they finally left the home of their forefishes, crawled onto the Texas shore, and gave up their gills. They also stopped speaking Yiddish. And they never call again.

 

It was a tough life out on the range, and for millions of years, until approximately 7:30 AM, not much happened to speak of, save for the evolution and extinction of about a billion different species.

 

Those critters stuck in the seas were born and died, their carcasses slowly falling to the sea’s floor in layers upon layers. Little did those poor creatures know that they were giving their life so that millions of years later, they could get pumped into the world’s gas tanks, enriching the children of the children of the children of their brothers who had crawled out onto dry land. It provides a lesson still taught today: There are three secrets to success Location, Location and Location.

 

Soon, the dinosaurs took over the prairie. “Oh give me a home where the dinosaurs roam…and I’ll show you a house full of dinosaur’s doo doo”

 

These terrible lizards ruled all they surveyed. They were the top of the food chain. Everyone wanted to grow up and be like them. Dinosaur hats, movies, and toys were the things. The French complained that the dinosaurs were poisoning pure French culture and language.

 

And suddenly…they were gone. No one knows where they went. Some say they headed north because air conditioning hadn’t been invented yet. But no one up there has seen them either. But the smart money says that they went to California. They could probably hide there and no one would notice. All that remains of these terrible lizards are pictures of their tiny cousins who can be seen on fancy T-shirts. Even their TV series, which was very good, by the way, was cancelled. Just like the real dinosaurs.

 

Years passed, then centuries, then eons. Little monkeys turned into bigger monkeys. And finally, bigger monkeys made monkeys of us all and turned into us… human beings. Except for some who turned into creationists? Go figure.

 

The first human Texans probably came into our area from Asia, across the Bering land bridge, since they couldn’t afford the toll to use the tunnel, and the bridge was free. That’s probably why the original Texans spoke Russian. If you don’t believe me, just try and explain why the accent is so different down here.

 

The site where Bruceville now stands was an old Indian campground. We know this because we found packages of curry powder all over the place. The Indians would stop and get water from a spring which was located by the creek that runs east of, and parallel to where the railroad now runs. There is an Indian graveyard in the woods about a quarter mile north of town. It is easy to locate by searching for the holes in the ground that early grave robbers dug while looking for money in the Indian graves. Even back then, the Indians knew not to trust the savings and Loan Institutions.

 

In the 1800’s this town was known as Masterville. But then the MK&T Railroad was built through here. Dr. Bruce, a prominent citizen owned the land around Masterville, and agreed to build a railroad depot on his property, provided the town was re-named for him. So it was renamed doctor…just kidding…it was named Bruceville.

 

At the time, Bruceville was an exciting town of 500 people. It was full of businesses including a large general store, a bank, a lumber yard, and a drug store with a soda fountain. “Exciting town” really meant something in those days. You could go shopping, buy a soda, cash a check, and obtain a 2×4. But it sure beat animal husbandry, which was a main passion among the local farmers, till the authorities actually caught them at it. There was even a hotel here.

 

Colonel Ross operated a moving picture studio on his lot behind the hotel. It was the sight of many good times, town picnics and celebrations. Not to mention revivals, carnivals, and political debates. Today, of course, we have political carnivals and debate revivals. The political debates of the time would occasionally feature fist fights. George Cox was a large landowner at the time. We are not sure whether he owned a large plot of land or whether he was just large. We do know that when he drank a large amount, he would drive into town, curse, and preach politics on the main downtown street. He could be heard all over town. And they didn’t even have TV or Public Address systems.

 

There was once an attempted bank robbery at the Bruceville Bank. Nolan Taylor, the cashier, overpowered the robber and with Clayton Clendennin’s help, held the hapless robber until the Sheriff could arrive. Nolan had the one bullet that was fired made into a charm and wore it until the day he died. It was a one-bullet town, even in those days.

 

Bruceville always had a fine baseball team. They played in the Tile Mayfield’s pasture on the hill east of town. They finally moved when the town refused to raise taxes to build them what the owners felt would be an appropriately sized covered arena in which to play. They also felt that they couldn’t get enough of the townspeople to buy luxury sky boxes. Go figure. The team now plays the sport under the unlikely name of “The New York Yankees”.

 

Until the depression; Bruceville was a busy progressive community. But even though the farmers were producing, they couldn’t find markets for their crops. The depression was not even eased by Prozac and many farmers had to get government aid. Of course, since they were all Republicans, they deny they ever got anything of value from the government.

 

Mr Rucker, the barber at the time, also helped in the funeral business, and a growth industry it was. Without him, we would have been up to our necks in the dearly beloved. He used to carve a notch in his razor for every corpse whose hair he cut.

 

In 1935, there was a terrible train accident at a bend in the tracks right where the post office still stands. People still talk about it today. Lots of cattle were killed, as were many hobos who rode the rails for free. People started to move away after that, but they didn’t take the train.

 

Then in the early 1940’s, fire broke out on the Main Street, and destroyed all of the businesses that had been located there. The only building left standing was the post office, the same one we still use today.

 

What fire couldn’t accomplish, the government almost did. In 1976, the US postal service decreed, the post office did not do enough business to remain open, and it was slated to be closed.

 

Hearing about this, the Union of American Hebrew Congregations decided to take one of its many stands. The Texans Oklahoma Camp Commission had been looking for a site on which to build the latest UAHC camp. They looked for a site that was equally difficult for everyone to get to, threw a dart at a map of Texas and Oklahoma, and saved the Bruceville post office in the process.

 

The locals began to take notice, when the dump trucks, construction workers, and Jewish people started to arrive. It wasn’t long before the Post Office was expanded, a gas station was built, and the entire community began to line up for job applications.

 

And the only reason we’re telling you this story tonight is so you can be proud of the lovely little berg in which you will spend the most glorious summer of your life. And if anyone ever asks you where you are and if they can come visit, just stand up tall, like a true Texan. Stand up proud, like a true American. Shuckle back and forth like a true blue jew and sing,

 

Bring your Lexus to Bruceville Texas…Come to Greene Family Camp

It’s an Hour north of Austin, A century south of Boston

A little south of Waco…You can’t get lost so

Bring your Lexus to Bruceville Texas…Come to Greene Family Camp.